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University of Colorado

About the school's commitment to protecting workers' rights and the FLA Workplace Code of Conduct: All University of Colorado licensees must adhere to ethical business practices as well as standards related to quality, reliability and cost. In doing so, workers producing University licensed goods are expected to work in humane and safe conditions and receive fair wages. Licensees are expected to provide a safe and healthy work environment for all employees. Licensees are expected to adhere to limitations on required hours of work; to limitations on child labor, and prohibitions on the use of forced labor. Licensees are expected to conduct business in a manner consistent with the standards outlined in this policy. The "licensee" shall include all persons or entities that have entered into a written Licensing Agreement with the University to use University Marks. Additionally, these standards shall apply to all of the licensee's contractors, vendors or manufacturers when engaged in the production of a University licensed product. The University will consider information in monitoring licensee compliance with this policy from the following sources: the Fair Labor Association, the Workers Rights Consortium, the International Labor Organization, other organizations, as well as other information available to the University.

FLA's Jorge Perez-Lopez & Omar Salazar Alvarado of ASEPROLA On March 17, FLA hosted a seminar and discussion in Washington, D.C., on social protection for apparel and footwear workers, with emphasis on Central America. Omar Salazar Alvarado, Executive Director of the Asociación de Servicios de Promoción Laboral (ASEPROLA), presented the paper Enhancing Social Protection in the Apparel and Footwear Industry in Central America, which was commissioned by the MFA Forum as part of its Sustainable Apparel and Footwear Initiative. The target countries in the study were...
On March 17, FLA published a paper by ASOCIACIÓN SERVICIOS DE PROMOCIÓN LABORAL on social protection for apparel and footwear workers in Central America. The target countries in the study were Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, and Nicaragua – which have seen an estimated 20% decrease in employment in this sector over the past three years caused by the financial crisis in the United States and an increased shift of apparel and footwear production to Asian countries. The investigation formulates, together with a series of critical opinions of the system that is behind the...