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Central America Project

Map of Central America

The Central America Project was launched in collaboration with FLA Participating Companies - including adidas Group, Nike, Inc., Gildan, Liz Claiborne, and PVH Corp. - to develop long-lasting mechanisms and tools to produce measurable improvements in workplace conditions in El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras. The project primarily focused on the issues of discrimination, harassment and abuse, and freedom of association in the apparel assembly or maquila sector.

Jo-In Project

The Jo-In Project was a collaborative effort of six leading international labor rights and code implementation organizations, including the Clean Clothes Campaign (CCC), Ethical Trading Initiative (ETI), Fair Labor Association (FLA), Fair Wear Foundation (FWF), Social Accountability International (SAI), and Worker Rights Consortium (WRC). The Jo-In project focused on enhancing collaboration among these organizations to identify best practices in the field of code implementation.

Nike, Inc.

Nike has been evolving its mindset and its field operations away from a compliance auditing model towards a coaching model for factory partners focusing on continuing improvement in sustainability. We are looking forward to continued partnership with FLA in the development of industry-wide tools to build sustainable supply chains in the footwear and apparel industry.

Nike, Inc.

All Nike footwear, apparel and equipment. Nike, Inc.'s compliance program is accredited by FLA.

From the Nike, Inc. website: Our greatest responsibility as a global company is to play a role in bringing about positive, systemic change for workers within our supply chain and in the industry. We're looking end-to-end, from the first phase of our product creation process to the impacts of our decisions on the lives of workers in the factories that bring our product to life.

Fair Working Hours and Compensation for Workers in China

Issues: During a 2008 FLA external assessment of a garment factory supplying the SanMar Corporation, FLA assessors found that the factory’s attendance and payroll records were “undependable and unreliable.” There was no way to verify the wages of the factory's 139 workers, resulting in uncertainties such as whether payment was made for all hours worked (production records showed hours worked in factory that were not on payroll records) and whether employees were paid correct wages (for both regular hours and overtime).

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