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Supply Chain Innovation

adidas

adidas owns adidas and Reebok brands, and its social compliance program is accredited by FLA.

From the adidas website: Being a sustainable business is about striking the balance between shareholder expectations and the needs and concerns of our employees, the workers in our supply chain, and the environment. We truly believe that acting as a responsible business – one that is fully committed to respecting human rights – will contribute to lasting economic success.

FLA Board discusses Code of Conduct enhancements Earlier today, FLA held a live stakeholder webinar to announce its enhanced Workplace Code of Conduct and Compliance Benchmarks. Approved by the FLA Board of Directors on June 14, the revised Code strengthens protection of workers’ rights and reflects lessons learned during implementation of the former Code over the past decade. Enhancements include: Requirements to establish human resource management policies and procedures along the entire factory employment lifecycle, from recruitment and hiring to terms and conditions of...

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On Tuesday, July 14, 2015, the Fair Labor Association sent a letter to the Ministry of Labor in Myanmar standing against efforts to exempt the fast-growing garment sector from paying their workers the country's new minimum wage.  The letter was signed by the FLA Vice President of Programs and 17 FLA affiliates.  

In November 2014, FLA-affiliated company Adidas requested that the Fair Labor Association (FLA) conduct an unannounced assessment at their supplying factory Paragon Apparels Pvt. Ltd., in Noida, India, to check the factory’s progress on compliance issues identified by previous assessments conducted at the factory by Adidas or by the FLA. A team from the Association of Stimulating Know-How (ASK) conducted the assessment in December 2014.

Following the death of a young child in a day-care facility run by the Gokaldas India factory in Bangalore (supplier for FLA affiliate Adidas), the FLA received a request for an investigation into the circumstances surrounding the child’s medical emergency, including several factors leading to delays in securing medical attention.

On December 2, 2014, a worker at the factory New Holland Apparel de Nicaragua, in Nicaragua, filed a Third Party Complaint with the FLA alleging that she had been dismissed from her job because of her union affiliation; moreover, the worker alleged that she was harassed by management, which had led to psychological trauma and the need for medical treatment.  

Between November 2014 and March 2015, the Petralex factory in Villanueva, Honduras, illegally fired or forced the resignations of at least 19 garment workers, including nine SITRAPETRALEX union leaders, and 10 union affiliates or relatives of union leaders, according to an independent investigation conducted by the Fair Labor Association (FLA) in April of 2015.

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