Transparency

 

Assessments

Affiliates may request assessments in addition to FLA's standard monitoring. FLA also assesses compliance programs of Participating Companies, accrediting those in substantial compliance with FLA's Code.

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Tracking Charts

Since 2002, FLA has conducted more than 1,500 unannounced factory visits throughout the supply chains of company affiliates. The results of these assessments are publicly available.

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Safeguards

FLA's transparent and effective process for handling third party complaints and investigations addresses workers' rights violations flagged by union representatives, workers, or local CSOs.

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In August 2015, the FLA accepted a Third Party Complaint filed by the labor union Unidos en Victoria alleging freedom of association violations and improper dismissals at the factory Troon Manufacturing in Tipitapa, Nicaragua. The FLA accepted the case for review, informing adidas-Group, an FLA-affiliated company that sourced from the factory.  FLA Participating Companies have up to 45 days to investigate the alleged noncompliance internally and inform the FLA of what they find.

In May 2015, a representative of Workers United, the union that represents workers at the factory Mongru Neckwear, in Long Island City, New York, alleged that Category B Licensee Vineyard Vines had failed to remediate noncompliances identified by the FLA during an assessment conducted in December 2014.

On June 30, 2015, the Fair Labor Association (FLA) accepted for review a Third Party Complaint filed by a worker alleging violations of the FLA Workplace Code of Conduct regarding compensation and hours of work by FLA-affiliated company Ethical Fashion Africa, Ltd. in Kenya. The FLA selected independent expert Leonard Nawiri, based in Nairobi, Kenya, to conduct an assessment of the allegations and prepare a report and relevant recommendations.

On April 28, 2015, trade unions in El Salvador filed a Third Party Complaint with the Fair Labor Association (FLA) alleging that the Impression Apparel factory was not in compliance with several benchmarks of the FLA Workplace Code of Conduct.  Allegations included violations of workers' freedom of association, harsh penalties for infractions as minor as arriving one minute late for work, and the improper use of temporary contracts for permanent work, in order to avoid paying benefits.  

On March 2, 2015, the Federation of Dominican Free Trade Zone, Diverse Industries, and Services Workers (Federación Dominicana de Trabajadores de Zonas Francas, Industrias Diversas y de Servicios, FEDOTRAZONAS) in the Dominican Republic filed a Third Party Complaint with the Fair Labor Association (FLA) alleging violations of freedom of association by JoeAnne Dominicana against the local union United Workers Union (Sindicato de Trabajadores Unidos), affiliated to FEDOTRAZONAS.

EA works with a supplier factory in Mexico to protect worker health and safety and remedy issues related to wages and benefits following an FLA assessment.

Acushnet Company works with supplier in Thailand to protect workers' rights to freedom of association following an FLA assessment.

Following an FLA assessment, VF Corporation works with supplier in El Salvador to ensure accurate compensation for overtime work.

adidas and Nike work with a Vietnamese apparel supplier to prevent forced labor, respect freedom of association, and protect the health and safety of the factory's 2,275 workers following an FLA assessment.

adidas and Forty Seven Brand work with supplier in Bangladesh to prevent discrimination against pregnant women following an FLA assessment.

Across the globe, millions of men and women migrate in order to find jobs. Many of them provide for their families by working in factories to manufacture clothing and footwear for some of the largest international brands. While some of these workers are successful in finding suitable employment, many others face difficulties ranging from homesickness to bad working conditions, and may even be forced into trafficking – otherwise known as modern-day slavery. Notre Dame students attend the FLA forum to learn more about labor conditions in apparel supply chains The FLA hosted a...
In February, FLA President & CEO Auret van Heerden participated in a workshop – Company Responsibilities in Countries with Human Rights Challenges – organized by the Business Humanitarian Forum and the Swiss Federal Department of Foreign Affairs. The event was held against the backdrop of the recently published draft report “Guiding Principles for the Implementation of the United Nations ‘Protect, Respect and Remedy’ Framework” by the Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General on Business and Human Rights, Professor John Ruggie. Auret...

In August 2015, the FLA accepted a Third Party Complaint filed by the labor union Unidos en Victoria alleging freedom of association violations and improper dismissals at the factory Troon Manufacturing in Tipitapa, Nicaragua. The FLA accepted the case for review, informing adidas-Group, an FLA-affiliated company that sourced from the factory.  FLA Participating Companies have up to 45 days to investigate the alleged noncompliance internally and inform the FLA of what they find.

In May 2015, a representative of Workers United, the union that represents workers at the factory Mongru Neckwear, in Long Island City, New York, alleged that Category B Licensee Vineyard Vines had failed to remediate noncompliances identified by the FLA during an assessment conducted in December 2014.

On June 30, 2015, the Fair Labor Association (FLA) accepted for review a Third Party Complaint filed by a worker alleging violations of the FLA Workplace Code of Conduct regarding compensation and hours of work by FLA-affiliated company Ethical Fashion Africa, Ltd. in Kenya. The FLA selected independent expert Leonard Nawiri, based in Nairobi, Kenya, to conduct an assessment of the allegations and prepare a report and relevant recommendations.

On April 28, 2015, trade unions in El Salvador filed a Third Party Complaint with the Fair Labor Association (FLA) alleging that the Impression Apparel factory was not in compliance with several benchmarks of the FLA Workplace Code of Conduct.  Allegations included violations of workers' freedom of association, harsh penalties for infractions as minor as arriving one minute late for work, and the improper use of temporary contracts for permanent work, in order to avoid paying benefits.  

On March 2, 2015, the Federation of Dominican Free Trade Zone, Diverse Industries, and Services Workers (Federación Dominicana de Trabajadores de Zonas Francas, Industrias Diversas y de Servicios, FEDOTRAZONAS) in the Dominican Republic filed a Third Party Complaint with the Fair Labor Association (FLA) alleging violations of freedom of association by JoeAnne Dominicana against the local union United Workers Union (Sindicato de Trabajadores Unidos), affiliated to FEDOTRAZONAS.